Sulggi Lee, MD, PhD

Associate Prof In Residence
Medicine
+1 415 735-5127
Research Description: 

Sulggi Lee, MD PhD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine in Residence at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and a faculty member in the Division of HIV, Infectious Diseases, and Global Medicine at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. She is Co-PI of the UCSF SCOPE HIV cohort which includes over 2,500+ HIV+ participants, the PI of the UCSF Acute HIV study (individuals diagnosed within 100 days of infection), the PI of the acute COVID-19 Host Immune Response Pathogenesis (CHIRP) study (over 300 longitudinal specimens from recently COVID-19 convalescent individuals in the outpatient setting), and the Clinical Core Director of the UCSF amfAR HIV Cure Institute. Her lab investigates the role of host genetics and immunology in infectious diseases pathogenesis and persistence using a variety of high-throughput sequencing methods (whole exome DNA sequencing, single-cell RNA and antibody sequencing) and discovery-based ‘multi-omic’ analytic approaches. Her work leverages patients samples from observational and clinical trials to identify novel targets for the treatment of infectious diseases. This work includes research focused on host-specific drug responses to interventions (e.g., HIV cure interventional trials) using pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic modeling and research to identify genetic and immunologic signatures that predict extreme clinical phenotypes (e.g., HIV “elite” controllers who are able to suppress virus in the absence of therapy or asymptomatic COVID+ individuals with robust immune responses to SARS-CoV-2).

Primary Thematic Area: 
Human Genetics
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Immunology
Research Summary: 
Clinical translational research to identify host genetic and immunologic predictors of infectious diseases (e.g., HIV and SARS-CoV-2) using high dimensional single cell and systems biology approaches.

Websites

Featured Publications: 

SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells exhibit unique features characterized by robust helper function, lack of terminal differentiation, and high proliferative potential.

bioRxiv : the preprint server for biology

Neidleman J, Luo X, Frouard J, Xie G, Gurjot G, Stein ES, McGregor M, Ma T, George AF, Kosters A, Greene WC, Vasquez J, Ghosn E, Lee S, Roan NR

Antiretroviral Therapy Concentrations Differ in Gut vs. Lymph Node Tissues and Are Associated With HIV Viral Transcription by a Novel RT-ddPCR Assay.

Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)

Lee SA, Telwatte S, Hatano H, Kashuba ADM, Cottrell ML, Hoh R, Liegler TJ, Stephenson S, Somsouk M, Hunt PW, Deeks SG, Yukl S, Savic RM

Gut and blood differ in constitutive blocks to HIV transcription, suggesting tissue-specific differences in the mechanisms that govern HIV latency.

PLoS pathogens

Telwatte S, Lee S, Somsouk M, Hatano H, Baker C, Kaiser P, Kim P, Chen TH, Milush J, Hunt PW, Deeks SG, Wong JK, Yukl SA

Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Disulfiram on Inducing Latent HIV-1 Transcription in a Phase IIb Trial.

Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics

Lee SA, Elliott JH, McMahon J, Hartogenesis W, Bumpus NN, Lifson JD, Gorelick RJ, Bacchetti P, Deeks SG, Lewin SR, Savic RM

Immunologic Pathways That Predict Mortality in HIV-Infected Ugandans Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy.

The Journal of infectious diseases

Lee S, Byakwaga H, Boum Y, Burdo TH, Williams KC, Lederman MM, Huang Y, Tracy RP, Cao H, Haberer JE, Kembabazi A, Bangsberg DR, Martin JN, Hunt PW

Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy.

PloS one

Lee SA, Bacchetti P, Chomont N, Fromentin R, Lewin SR, O'Doherty U, Palmer S, Richman DD, Siliciano JD, Yukl SA, Deeks SG, Burbelo PD

Host genetic predictors of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism among treated HIV-infected Ugandans.

AIDS (London, England)

Lee SA, Mefford JA, Huang Y, Witte JS, Martin JN, Haas DW, Mclaren PJ, Mushiroda T, Kubo M, Byakwaga H, Hunt PW, Kroetz DL

Low proportions of CD28- CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 can be reversed by early ART initiation and predict mortality in treated HIV infection.

The Journal of infectious diseases

Lee SA, Sinclair E, Jain V, Huang Y, Epling L, Van Natta M, Meinert CL, Martin JN, McCune JM, Deeks SG, Lederman MM, Hecht FM, Hunt PW

Impact of HIV on CD8+ T cell CD57 expression is distinct from that of CMV and aging.

PloS one

Lee SA, Sinclair E, Hatano H, Hsue PY, Epling L, Hecht FM, Bangsberg DR, Martin JN, McCune JM, Deeks SG, Hunt PW