Matthew Stachler, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor
Pathology
+1 415 514-1902
Research Description: 

Clinically, I am a Molecular Pathologist focused on using advanced, cutting edge tests to drive personalized medicine in cancer diagnostics and treatment.

My lab works to understand the process of premalignant progression to invasive cancer, specifically focusing on cancers (esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma) and pre-malignant conditions (columnar and intestinal metaplasia or Barrett’s esophagus) of the upper gastrointestinal tract as a model system.

As a disease that is often closely monitored and sampled, Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma provides an idea system to study the changes leading up to and driving invasive disease. Additionally, Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma are extremely important diseases to understand in their own as esophageal adenocarcinoma has one of the fastest rising incidences of any solid tumor and despite our understanding that it arises from a metaplastic field, we still do an extremely poor job of identifying patients early before advanced disease develops.

We have taken the approach to first understand the factors important in human tissues through advanced ‘omics’ and digital imaging approaches and then use this understanding to build model systems and functional studies. It is our goal to use the knowledge and understanding gained in these studies to develop novel biomarkers, screening strategies, and treatments to identify and treat people early before advanced disease develops.

Primary Thematic Area: 
Cancer Biology & Cell Signaling
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Human Genetics
Research Summary: 
We strive to understand the events that drive progression of pre-malignant disease into invasive cancer, focusing on gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma.
Publications: 

Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Pembrolizumab in Resectable Locally Advanced, Human Papillomavirus-Unrelated Head and Neck Cancer: A Multicenter, Phase 2 Trial.

Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research

Uppaluri R, Campbell KM, Egloff AM, Zolkind P, Skidmore ZL, Nussenbaum B, Paniello RC, Rich JT, Jackson R, Pipkorn P, Michel LS, Ley J, Oppelt P, Dunn GP, Barnell EK, Spies NC, Lin T, Li T, Mulder D, Hanna Y, Cirlan I, Pugh TJ, Mudianto T, Riley R, Zhou L, Jo VY, Stachler MD, Hanna GJ, Kass JI, Haddad RI, Schoenfeld JD, Gjini E, Lako A, Thorstad WL, Gay HA, Daly M, Rodig S, Hagemann IS, Kallogjeri D, Piccirillo JF, Chernock RD, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Adkins DR

Early TP53 alterations engage environmental exposures to promote gastric premalignancy in an integrative mouse model.

Nature genetics

Sethi NS, Kikuchi O, Duronio GN, Stachler MD, McFarland JM, Ferrer-Luna R, Zhang Y, Bao C, Bronson R, Patil D, Sanchez-Vega F, Liu JB, Sicinska E, Lazaro JB, Ligon KL, Beroukhim R, Bass AJ

Gain-of-Function RHOA Mutations Promote Focal Adhesion Kinase Activation and Dependency in Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

Cancer discovery

Zhang H, Schaefer A, Wang Y, Hodge RG, Blake DR, Diehl JN, Papageorge AG, Stachler MD, Liao J, Zhou J, Wu Z, Akarca FG, de Klerk LK, Derks S, Pierobon M, Hoadley KA, Wang TC, Church G, Wong KK, Petricoin EF, Cox AD, Lowy DR, Der CJ, Bass AJ

Colorectal Adenocarcinoma, Not Just One Disease.

Cellular and molecular gastroenterology and hepatology

Stachler MD