Margaret Feeney, MD

Professor
Department of Pediatrics
Research Description: 

Dr. Feeney is a Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Global Health at UCSF. She is the Principal Investigator of several NIH-funded projects focused on the immune response to malaria and HIV among infants and children. Dr. Feeney is board certified in Pediatric Infectious Diseases and provides clinical care for children with complex infections at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, where she also teaches students and housestaff. She holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Medicine (Division of Experimental Medicine) where her laboratory is based. She is active in mentoring programs for medical students, residents, and junior faculty, and is the recipient of an NIH K24 Mentoring Award entitled “Mentoring Translational Researchers for Careers in Pediatric Global Health”.

Dr. Feeney’s research interests encompass the host response to infection and age-based differences in the immune response. From 2002-09, while on the faculty at Harvard Medical School, her laboratory conducted key studies of the infant antiviral immune response following mother-to-child transmission of HIV, in collaboration with pediatric clinicians South Africa and Jamaica. More recently, her lab has focused on understanding natural immunity to malaria, identifying correlates of protective antimalarial immunity to guide vaccine design, and investigating the impact of in utero antigen exposure on the fetal immune response to malaria and other perinatal pathogens. Dr. Feeney was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 2016 and has received several research awards including the Elizabeth Glaser Scientist Award from the Pediatric AIDS Foundation (2006) and the William F. Friedman Pediatric Research Award (2011). She currently holds the Edward B. Shaw Chair in Pediatrics.

Primary Thematic Area: 
Immunology
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Virology & Microbial Pathogenesis
Research Summary: 
Immunopathogenesis of HIV and malaria in childhood

Websites

Publications: 

Peripheral Plasmodium falciparum infection in early pregnancy is associated with increased maternal microchimerism in the offspring.

The Journal of infectious diseases

Simon N, Shallat J, Houck J, Jagannathan P, Prahl M, Muhindo MK, Kakuru A, Olwoch P, Feeney ME, Harrington WE

HLA Alleles B*53:01 and C*06:02 Are Associated With Higher Risk of P. falciparum Parasitemia in a Cohort in Uganda.

Frontiers in immunology

Digitale JC, Callaway PC, Martin M, Nelson G, Viard M, Rek J, Arinaitwe E, Dorsey G, Kamya M, Carrington M, Rodriguez-Barraquer I, Feeney ME

Malaria and Early Life Immunity: Competence in Context.

Frontiers in immunology

Callaway PC, Farrington LA, Feeney ME

Exposure to pesticides in utero impacts the fetal immune system and response to vaccination in infancy.

Nature communications

Prahl M, Odorizzi P, Gingrich D, Muhindo M, McIntyre T, Budker R, Jagannathan P, Farrington L, Nalubega M, Nankya F, Sikyomu E, Musinguzi K, Naluwu K, Auma A, Kakuru A, Kamya MR, Dorsey G, Aweeka F, Feeney ME

Inhibitory KIR ligands are associated with higher P. falciparum parasite prevalence.

The Journal of infectious diseases

Digitale JC, Callaway PC, Martin M, Nelson G, Viard M, Rek J, Arinaitwe E, Dorsey G, Kamya M, Carrington M, Rodriguez-Barraquer I, Feeney ME