James Bayrer, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor
Pediatrics
+1 415 502-2352
Research Description: 

As a pediatric gastroenterologist and physician scientist, I am keenly aware of the challenges faced by our pediatric population. The intestinal epithelium comprises the human body’s greatest environmentally exposed surface and is the largest sensory and endocrine organ. My research utilizes human intestinal organoids and animal models to understand how the intestine senses and responds to both regular and inflammatory stimuli. By investigating the molecular pathways involved, we aim to discover new ways to promote intestinal wound healing and modulate the signals contributing to visceral pain syndromes.

Primary Thematic Area: 
Developmental & Stem Cell Biology
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Tissue / Organ Biology & Endocrinology
Research Summary: 
Our laboratory deciphers the molecular machinery controlling intestinal epithelial renewal and gut signaling via genetic disease models coupled with mouse and human intestinal organoids.

Websites

Featured Publications: 

LRH-1 mitigates intestinal inflammatory disease by maintaining epithelial homeostasis and cell survival.

Nature communications

Bayrer JR, Wang H, Nattiv R, Suzawa M, Escusa HS, Fletterick RJ, Klein OD, Moore DD, Ingraham HA

Advances in Enteric Neurobiology: The "Brain" in the Gut in Health and Disease.

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Kulkarni S, Ganz J, Bayrer J, Becker L, Bogunovic M, Rao M

Enterochromaffin Cells Are Gut Chemosensors that Couple to Sensory Neural Pathways.

Cell

Bellono NW, Bayrer JR, Leitch DB, Castro J, Zhang C, O'Donnell TA, Brierley SM, Ingraham HA, Julius D