Arnold Kriegstein, MD, PhD

Director
Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research
Department of Neurology
Research Description: 

Dr. Kriegstein received BA from Yale University and his MD and PhD degrees from New York University in 1977 where his thesis advisor was Dr. Eric Kandel. He subsequently completed Residency training in Neurology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital, and Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He has held academic appointments at Stanford University, Yale University, and Columbia University. In 2004 he joined the Neurology Department at the University of California, San Francisco. He is currently the John Bowes Distinguished Professor in Stem Cell and Tissue Biology and Founding Director of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF. Dr. Kriegstein’s own research focuses on the way in which neural stem and progenitor cells in the embryonic brain produce neurons, and ways in which this information can be used for cell based therapies to treat diseases of the nervous system. His lab found that radial glial cells are neuronal stem cells in the developing brain, and also identified a second type of precursor cell produced by radial glial cells that is responsible for generating specific neuronal subtypes. He has recently begun to characterize the progenitor cells within the developing human brain, to determine the genetic profiles of specific progenitor populations, and to explore how these cells contribute to the huge expansion of neuron number that characterizes human cerebral cortex.

Primary Thematic Area: 
Developmental & Stem Cell Biology
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Neurobiology
Research Summary: 
Neural Stem Cells and Embryonic Cortical Development
Mentorship Development: 

4/29/19    Sharpening your Mentoring Skills (SyMS) with Sharon Milgram (Parnassus)    
9/11/20    Mentoring Across Differences
2/16/21    Three Truths and Three Tries: Facing and Overcoming Critical Social Justice Challenges at the Micro, Mezzo, and Macro Levels    

Websites

Publications: 

An ACVR1 activating mutation causes neuropathic pain and sensory neuron hyperexcitability in humans.

Pain

Yu X, Ton AN, Niu Z, Morales BM, Chen J, Braz J, Lai MH, Barruet E, Liu H, Cheung K, Ali S, Chan T, Bigay K, Ho J, Nikolli I, Hansberry S, Wentworth K, Kriegstein A, Basbaum A, Hsiao EC

Diversifying stem cell debates: Including Muslim contexts and perspectives.

Stem cell reports

Dajani R, Jiwani B, Nanji A, Zoloth L, Ghaly M, Ilkiliç I, Raya Á, Patrão Neves M, de Melo H, Carvalho AS, Caulfield T, Carter R, Rendas A, Surani A, Rossant J, Kriegstein A, Lalani EN

Nests of dividing neuroblasts sustain interneuron production for the developing human brain.

Science (New York, N.Y.)

Paredes MF, Mora C, Flores-Ramirez Q, Cebrian-Silla A, Del Dosso A, Larimer P, Chen J, Kang G, Gonzalez Granero S, Garcia E, Chu J, Delgado R, Cotter JA, Tang V, Spatazza J, Obernier K, Ferrer Lozano J, Vento M, Scott J, Studholme C, Nowakowski TJ, Kriegstein AR, Oldham MC, Hasenstaub A, Garcia-Verdugo JM, Alvarez-Buylla A, Huang EJ

Challenges of Organoid Research.

Annual review of neuroscience

Andrews MG, Kriegstein AR

Identification of Lipid Heterogeneity and Diversity in the Developing Human Brain.

JACS Au

Bhaduri A, Neumann EK, Kriegstein AR, Sweedler JV