Torsten Wittmann, PhD

Professor
Department of Cell & Tissue Biology
+1 415 476-2603

Modern molecular biology presents us with a growing list of molecules that build a living cell. However, how the diverse activities of these molecules are coordinated in space and time to generate functional cell biology is an increasingly complex and essentially unresolved question. My research program focuses on the microtubule cytoskeleton, a highly dynamic filament system inside cells that is critically important to spatially and temporally organize eukaryotic cells during cell migration, division and differentiation. One of my long-term scientific goals is to elucidate molecular mechanisms by which local control of the MT cytoskeleton guides complex cell behaviors, and we are particularly interested in the function of protein complexes on growing microtubule ends. Addressing questions on local dynamic processes in cells also requires novel experimental approaches, and to achieve this goal we are employing advanced quantitative live cell microscopy combined with pioneering innovative ‘opto-cell biology’ that we define as synthetic light-control of cellular protein activity with high spatial and temporal precision.

Primary Thematic Area: 
Cancer Biology & Cell Signaling
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Tissue / Organ Biology & Endocrinology
Research Summary: 
Microtubule control of cell dynamics

Websites

Featured Publications: 

Doublecortin Is Excluded from Growing Microtubule Ends and Recognizes the GDP-Microtubule Lattice.

Current biology : CB

Ettinger A, van Haren J, Ribeiro SA, Wittmann T

CLASPs link focal-adhesion-associated microtubule capture to localized exocytosis and adhesion site turnover.

Nature cell biology

Stehbens SJ, Paszek M, Pemble H, Ettinger A, Gierke S, Wittmann T

Multisite phosphorylation disrupts arginine-glutamate salt bridge networks required for binding of cytoplasmic linker-associated protein 2 (CLASP2) to end-binding protein 1 (EB1).

The Journal of biological chemistry

Kumar P, Chimenti MS, Pemble H, Schönichen A, Thompson O, Jacobson MP, Wittmann T

Analysis of microtubule dynamic instability using a plus-end growth marker.

Nature methods

Matov A, Applegate K, Kumar P, Thoma C, Krek W, Danuser G, Wittmann T