Tamara Alliston, PhD

Assoc Prof of Orthosurg
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
allistont@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

Our research focuses on the molecular pathways controlling mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, how these pathways coordinate with physical cues to influence mechanical integrity of normal skeletal tissue, and how they can be harnessed to repair tissue damaged in degenerative skeletal disease. In particular we focus on defining the function of TGFβ in coordinating physical and biochemical cues to regulate skeletal cell differentiation. To answer these questions we combine molecular, cellular, physiologic, and materials science approaches. This interdisciplinary approach will lead to the identification of targets to prevent skeletal disease or to improve skeletal repair.

Primary Thematic Area: 
Tissue / Organ Biology & Endocrinology
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Cancer Biology & Cell Signaling
Research Summary: 
Our research focuses on the molecular pathways controlling mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

Websites

Publications: 

Glucocorticoid suppression of osteocyte perilacunar remodeling is associated with subchondral bone degeneration in osteonecrosis.

Scientific reports

Fowler TW, Acevedo C, Mazur CM, Hall-Glenn F, Fields AJ, Bale HA, Ritchie RO, Lotz JC, Vail TP, Alliston T

Effects of cell type and configuration on anabolic and catabolic activity in 3D co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and nucleus pulposus cells.

Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society

Ouyang A, Cerchiari AE, Tang X, Liebenberg E, Alliston T, Gartner ZJ, Lotz JC

Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

Bone

Jáuregui EJ, Akil O, Acevedo C, Hall-Glenn F, Tsai BS, Bale HA, Liebenberg E, Humphrey MB, Ritchie RO, Lustig LR, Alliston T

Mechanobiology of TGFß signaling in the skeleton.

Matrix biology : journal of the International Society for Matrix Biology

Rys JP, Monteiro DA, Alliston T

Discrete spatial organization of TGFß receptors couples receptor multimerization and signaling to cellular tension.

eLife

Rys JP, DuFort CC, Monteiro DA, Baird MA, Oses-Prieto JA, Chand S, Burlingame AL, Davidson MW, Alliston TN