Margaret Feeney, MD

Professor
Department of Pediatrics
feeneym@medsfgh.ucsf.edu

Dr. Feeney is a Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Global Health at UCSF. She is the Principal Investigator of several NIH-funded projects focused on the immune response to malaria and HIV among infants and children. Dr. Feeney is board certified in Pediatric Infectious Diseases and provides clinical care for children with complex infections at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, where she also teaches students and housestaff. She holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Medicine (Division of Experimental Medicine) where her laboratory is based. She is active in mentoring programs for medical students, residents, and junior faculty, and is the recipient of an NIH K24 Mentoring Award entitled “Mentoring Translational Researchers for Careers in Pediatric Global Health”.

Dr. Feeney’s research interests encompass the host response to infection and age-based differences in the immune response. From 2002-09, while on the faculty at Harvard Medical School, her laboratory conducted key studies of the infant antiviral immune response following mother-to-child transmission of HIV, in collaboration with pediatric clinicians South Africa and Jamaica. More recently, her lab has focused on understanding natural immunity to malaria, identifying correlates of protective antimalarial immunity to guide vaccine design, and investigating the impact of in utero antigen exposure on the fetal immune response to malaria and other perinatal pathogens. Dr. Feeney was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 2016 and has received several research awards including the Elizabeth Glaser Scientist Award from the Pediatric AIDS Foundation (2006) and the William F. Friedman Pediatric Research Award (2011). She currently holds the Edward B. Shaw Chair in Pediatrics.

Primary Thematic Area: 
Immunology
Secondary Thematic Area: 
Virology & Microbial Pathogenesis
Research Summary: 
Immunopathogenesis of HIV and malaria in childhood

Websites

Publications: 

Sex Disparity in Cord Blood FoxP3+ CD4 T Regulatory Cells in Infants Exposed to Malaria In Utero.

Open forum infectious diseases

Prahl M, Jagannathan P, McIntyre TI, Auma A, Wamala S, Nalubega M, Musinguzi K, Naluwu K, Sikyoma E, Budker R, Odorizzi P, Kakuru A, Havlir DV, Kamya MR, Dorsey G, Feeney ME

Timing of in utero malaria exposure influences fetal CD4 T cell regulatory versus effector differentiation.

Malaria journal

Prahl M, Jagannathan P, McIntyre TI, Auma A, Farrington L, Wamala S, Nalubega M, Musinguzi K, Naluwu K, Sikyoma E, Budker R, Vance H, Odorizzi P, Nayebare P, Ategeka J, Kakuru A, Havlir DV, Kamya MR, Dorsey G, Feeney ME

Impact of In Utero Exposure to Malaria on Fetal T Cell Immunity.

Trends in molecular medicine

Odorizzi PM, Feeney ME

A Novel Model of Asymptomatic Plasmodium Parasitemia That Recapitulates Elements of the Human Immune Response to Chronic Infection.

PloS one

Fontana MF, Baccarella A, Craft JF, Boyle MJ, McIntyre TI, Wood MD, Thorn KS, Anidi C, Bayat A, Chung MR, Hamburger R, Kim CY, Pearman E, Pham J, Tang JJ, Boon L, Kamya MR, Dorsey G, Feeney ME, Kim CC

Effective Antimalarial Chemoprevention in Childhood Enhances the Quality of CD4+ T Cells and Limits Their Production of Immunoregulatory Interleukin 10.

The Journal of infectious diseases

Jagannathan P, Bowen K, Nankya F, McIntyre TI, Auma A, Wamala S, Sikyomu E, Naluwu K, Nalubega M, Boyle MJ, Farrington LA, Bigira V, Kapisi J, Aweeka F, Greenhouse B, Kamya M, Dorsey G, Feeney ME