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David Sretavan, MD, PhD

David Sretavan, MD, PhD
Professor, Departments of Physiology and Opthalmology
Research Summary:
Mechanisms of axon injury, disease, and novel methods of axon repair
The Sretavan Laboratory is actively engaged in research on nerve and axon responses to injury, disease, and on novel methods for nerve repair. Our interest in these areas builds on previous work from the laboratory on developmental molecules that control axon growth and behavior during formation of the nervous system. Collectively known as axon guidance molecules,these proteins bind receptors on cells to activate signaling pathways to fundamentally regulate cytoskeletal assembly/disassembly and calcium handling. Our research group is particularly interested in the functional roles axon guidance molecules may have in the adult nervous system, specifically in the settings of CNS injury and disease. .

A new research area for the laboratory is the use of micro and nanosystems as enabling technology for axonal repair. Methodologies for silicon-based fabrication can be combined with sensing and actuation principles to form biomedical devices that operate at the micron length scale of single cells. This field of Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) engineering, coupled with advances in nanoscience may open up new frontiers in biological research, medical diagnostic & therapeutics. The Sretavan laboratory is leading a multidisciplinary group of researchers in MEMS engineering, nanoscience, biophysics, neurobiology and neurosurgery, to develop a microsystem platform for the microsurgical reconstruction and repair of single axons.

Selected Publications

Chang, W., Hawkes, E., Kliot, M., Sretavan, D.  In Vivo Use Of A Nanoknife For Axon Microsurgery. Neurosurgery 61: 683-692, 2007.
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Du, J., Tran, T., Hawkes, E., Sretavan, D. Up-regulation of EphB2 And ephrin-B2 Coincide With Axon Loss At The Optic Nerve Head of DBA/2J Glaucomatous Mice. Invest. Ophthal. Vis. Sci. 48: 5567-5581, 2007.
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Liu X, Hawkes E, Ishimaru T, Tran T, Sretavan DW. EphB3: an endogenous mediator of adult axonal plasticity and regrowth after CNS injury. J Neurosci. 2006 Mar 22;26(12):3087-101.
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David W. Sretavan, M.D., Ph.D., Wesley Chang, Ph.D, Elizabeth Hawkes, M.S., Christopher Keller, Ph.D, Michel Kliot, M.D. Microscale Surgery on Single Axons. 2005 Neurosurgery 57: 635-646.
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David B. Kantor, Onanong Chivatakarn, Katherine L. Peer, Stephen F. Oster, Masaru Inatani, Michael J. Hansen, John G. Flanagan, Yu Yamaguchi, David W. Sretavan, Roman J. Giger, and Alex L. Kolodkin. Semaphorin 5A is a Bifunctional Axon Guidance Cue Regulated by Heparan and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans. 2004 Neuron 44: 961-975.
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Chang WC, Keller CG, Sretavan DW. Precision MEMS nano-cutting device for precision microsurgery. 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress.
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Suh LH, Oster SF, Soehrman SS, Grenningloh G, Sretavan DW.
L1/Laminin modulation of growth cone response to EphB triggers growth pauses and regulates the microtubule destabilizing protein SCG10
J Neurosci. 2004 Feb 25;24(8):1976-86.
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Oster SF, Deiner M, Birgbauer E, Sretavan DW. Ganglion cell axon pathfinding in the retina and optic nerve. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2004 Feb;15(1):125-36.
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Goldberg JL, Vargas ME, Wang JT, Mandemakers W, Oster SE, Sretavan DW, Barres BA. An Oligodendrocyte Lineage-Specific Semaphorin, Sema5A, Inhibits Axon Growth by Retinal Ganglion Cell. J Neurosci. 2004 May 26;24(21):4989-4999.
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Oster SF, Bodeker MO, He F, Sretavan DW. Invariant Sema5A inhibition serves an ensheathing function during optic nerve development. Development. 2003 Feb;130(4):775-84.
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Oster SF, Sretavan DW. Connecting the eye to the brain: the molecular basis of ganglion cell axon guidance. Br J Ophthalmol. 2003 May;87(5):639-45. Review.
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Beggs HE, Schahin-Reed D, Zang K, Goebbels S, Nave KA, Gorski J, Jones KR, Sretavan D, Reichardt LF. FAK deficiency in cells contributing to the basal lamina results in cortical abnormalities resembling congenital muscular dystrophies.
Neuron. 2003 Oct 30;40(3):501-14.
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Birgbauer E, Oster SF, Severin CG, Sretavan DW. Retinal axon growth cones respond to EphB extracellular domains as inhibitory axon guidance cues.
Development. 2001 Aug;128(15):3041-8.
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Zhang F, Lu C, Severin C, Sretavan DW. GAP-43 mediates retinal axon interaction with lateral diencephalon cells during optic tract formation.
Development. 2000 Mar;127(5):969-80.
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Birgbauer E, Cowan CA, Sretavan DW, Henkemeyer M. Kinase independent function of EphB receptors in retinal axon pathfinding to the optic disc from dorsal but not ventral retina. Development. 2000 Mar;127(6):1231-41.
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Marcus RC, Shimamura K, Sretavan DW, Lai E, Rubenstein JLR, Mason CA. Domains of Regulatory Gene Expression and the Developing Optic Chiasm: Correspondence With Retinal Axon Paths and Candidate Signaling Cells. J Compartive Neurology 403:346-358 (1999)
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Deiner MS, Sretavan DW. Altered midline axon pathways and ectopic neurons in the developing hypothalamus of netrin-1- and DCC-deficient mice.
J Neurosci. 1999 Nov 15;19(22):9900-12.
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Sretavan DW, Kruger K. Randomized retinal ganglion cell axon routing at the optic chiasm of GAP-43-deficient mice: association with midline recrossing and lack of normal ipsilateral axon turning. J Neurosci. 1998 Dec 15;18(24):10502-13.
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Kruger K, Tam AS, Lu C, Sretavan DW. Retinal ganglion cell axon progression from the optic chiasm to initiate optic tract development requires cell autonomous function of GAP-43. J Neurosci. 1998 Aug 1;18(15):5692-705.
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